Furniture trend: reverse design

‘Reverse design’ is a phrase you’re probably going to be hearing again. It’s a practical and clever assault on the war on waste: instead of designing a product, and then sourcing the raw materials from which to make it, why not do it the other way around? Why not start with the raw materials, and work out how to use it as efficiently as you can? Two great recent examples show the way. First, Formtank’s 4foldlow table, whose base is made from a folded sheet of steel: using reverse design, its creator George Rice has squeezed eight tables from one sheet, wasting just 3.5 per cent of it – and it looks incredible. Second, Tom Dixon’s two new stools, one of which is made from offcuts of the other: one’s called Slab, and the other one’s called, you guessed, Offcut. (I feel a bit sorry for Offcut: I reckon Tom could have come up with a nicer name to boost its self-esteem.) This is one design philosophy where the only mystery is why it’s not the norm already.

4foldlow table, by Formtank

4foldlow table, by Formtank

Slab stool, by Tom Dixon

Slab stool, by Tom Dixon

Offcut stool, by Tom Dixon

Offcut stool, by Tom Dixon

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s